The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

2024 Commencement Student Speaker: Lea Tarzy
Alexandra Slofkiss: 2024 Commencement Soloist
Outstanding Senior Award: Bernadette Maramis
Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion: Gloria Sporea

Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion: Gloria Sporea

May 10, 2024

Excellence in Athletics Award: Meghan Quinn

Excellence in Athletics Award: Meghan Quinn

May 10, 2024

Excellence in the Arts Award: Joselyn Busato

Excellence in the Arts Award: Joselyn Busato

May 10, 2024

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That’s Haute: Couture Fashion Week in review

Haute Couture Fashion Week has arrived in Paris once again. This year’s collections, possibly the most exciting in years, were splendorous, voluminous and intriguing. The week kicked off with the unveiling of Daniel Roseberry’s collection for Schiaparelli, lovingly dubbed “Schiaparalien,” a body of work inspired by surrealist explorations of technology and the extraterrestrial. Inspired by founder Elsa Schiaparelli’s fascination with astronomy, the collection pays credence to the Maison’s origins. Latex, pearls and ornate necklines were the standard with the body of work, but the show stealer was the dress (and the accompanying robotic infant) made entirely of fragments of technology— CD’s, microchips and cell phones.

Virginie Viard’s collection for Chanel inaugurated the second day of the week with a collection inspired by the art of dance. Viard’s creations frequently reference Coco Chanel’s relationship with ballet, a fixation that began after taking lessons with ballerina Isadore Duncan. The collection found distinction in its use of white tights, leotards and lace. However, it also paid homage to many of Chanel’s distinct stylistic qualities— boucle blazers, extravagant collars and the dichotomy of black and white. Notably, actress Margaret Qualley initiated the collection in a cream tweed jacket and ruffled collar. Meanwhile, the annual closer, the unveiling of the Chanel bride, proved to be the perfect conglomerate of Viard’s girlish taste— gargantuan tulle sleeves blended into a long skirt that trailed behind the silver a-line mini dress. Perhaps not the most extravagant of bridal designs from the house, but it was a beautiful gown nonetheless.

Also toying with the concept of girlhood was newcomer Sohee Park, who unveiled her new couture collection for her line Miss Sohee at Paris’ luxurious Shangri-La Hotel. A recent graduate of Central Saint Martins, the London-based designer has quickly become known for her use of daring florals, femininity and grand extravagance. The collection was filled with loving references to Park’s South Korean heritage, expressed through color, form and motif. Lavish, satin skirts and ornate crystal embellishments swathed the models as they swept down the runway, framed by a backdrop of white roses. Flora and fauna were indeed repeating motifs in the show, as girlhood took center stage; a combination of sophistication and extravagance.

The selection of Simone Rocha as the annual guest designer for Jean Paul Gaultier also proved to be a success, blending seminal motifs from both her own body of work and Gaultier’s—including the iconic cone bra and the sailor hat. Extravagant gowns made of tulle, applique and pearls caught the eye of the onlooker as models strutted down the silver runway. Froth, flowers and feathers were the hallmarks of the collection. 

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Kim Jones’ collection for Fendi proved to be more subtly sophisticated than many of his peers. The looks were mostly designed in neutrals—blush tulle, black leather and silver sequins. Drawing influence from Karl Lagerfeld’s time as head of the house, the garments were inspired by futuristic designs embellished with crystals and chrome. Although there still was great experimentation in textile use, many of the silhouettes were more minimalistic.

Meanwhile, John Galliano’s collection for Maison Margiela was the exact opposite. Never a stranger to theatricality, Galliano wanted to craft not just the garments themselves, but the story that surrounded them. Inspired by the seedy underbelly of Parisian nightlife, the unveiling of the collection took place in a filthy, dimly lit nightclub. Models slowly sauntered down the runway with gravity-defying hair, unnatural body modifications and dewy makeup looks by Pat McGrath. However, the garments themselves stole the show. Nudity seemed to be the inspiration behind many of the pieces, as models were draped in sheer fabrics and laces that didn’t merely suggest promiscuity, but promoted it. With extravagant corsets and flowing tulle skirts, it is evident that Gallian intended to represent the dichotomy between formalism and human sexuality.

The driving function of Haute Couture Fashion Week is not necessarily to create functional, wearable garments, but to experiment with artistry. The aforementioned designers and maisons have undoubtedly crafted unique, arresting and fascinating collections that prove to the highest capacity that couture is as much fashion as it is life, culture and art.

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