The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

New business ideas presented and judged at BizPitch Competition
RAs elect to establish RA union on campus
How do we handle a culture of burnout?
Women’s Track and Field dominates Colonial Relays

Women’s Track and Field dominates Colonial Relays

April 12, 2024

“Quiet on Set” reveals harsh truth about children’s TV

“Quiet on Set” reveals harsh truth about children’s TV

April 12, 2024

Making a difference locally: Students bring back The Listening Post

Making a difference locally: Students bring back The Listening Post

April 12, 2024

View All

Creationism should be taught with evolution

Mary Morris

Writer

The topic of creationism versus evolution has been in debate for decades. Religion and science just don’t seem to be able to get along. As the Huffington Post reports debates over repealing Louisiana’s Science Education Act, I have found myself vying for the incorporation of creationism in education.

While I am not the best at attending church or abiding by religious ritual, I don’t see the problem with teaching creationism alongside evolution in schools. In my opinion, education should provide students with information from all perspectives so that individuals can be well-rounded and develop their own beliefs.

Story continues below advertisement

We can argue that creationism is not science or that science is ignorant of religion, but I don’t think that is the point of teaching one or the other. Some people believe that God created all things in seven days and we all stem from Adam and Eve. Some people believe that creatures developed through survival of the fittest and Darwinian theory. Others believe in a hybrid of the two theories, that God created evolution. The point is not who is right and who is wrong; the point is to be open to different perspectives and to respect each other for those perspectives.

The education system is responsible for developing the knowledge and decision-making skills of young students. If we choose to censor certain perspectives, then we are limiting students’ abilities to be open-minded and to think for themselves. Just as both Democratic and Republican philosophies on government are taught in the classroom, creationism and evolution should also be given the same treatment.

(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

The editorial board of The Bucknellian reserves the right to review all comments before they are posted on the website and remove any if deemed offensive, illegal or in bad taste. Comments left on our web pages are not necessarily in-line with the views expressed by the writer.
All The Bucknellian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *