The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

The weekly student newspaper of Bucknell University

The Bucknellian

2024 Commencement Student Speaker: Lea Tarzy
Alexandra Slofkiss: 2024 Commencement Soloist
Outstanding Senior Award: Bernadette Maramis
Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion: Gloria Sporea

Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion: Gloria Sporea

May 10, 2024

Excellence in Athletics Award: Meghan Quinn

Excellence in Athletics Award: Meghan Quinn

May 10, 2024

Excellence in the Arts Award: Joselyn Busato

Excellence in the Arts Award: Joselyn Busato

May 10, 2024

View All

Breaking the Bubble (04/26/2024)

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Kyle Putt / The Bucknellian

Domestic

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court assessed whether elements of Idaho’s nearly complete abortion ban clash with a federal law guaranteeing specific standards for emergency medical treatment, particularly for pregnant women. Justices are considering an appeal lodged by Idaho authorities challenging a lawsuit initiated by the Biden administration regarding abortion access during emergencies. The state’s abortion statute passed in 2020 after the Supreme Court’s reversal of Roe v. Wade and says that anyone who performs an abortion is subject to criminal penalties, including up to five years in prison. Healthcare professionals violating this law can lose their professional licenses. In response, the federal government filed a lawsuit, resulting in the issuance of an injunction to prevent Idaho from implementing regulations that limit access to medical care mandated by the federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act. The Supreme Court then took the matter up. This will be a very important case in judicial history, as it will provide the legal definition for “medical emergencies”.

On Tuesday, the Senate approved a bill allocating billions in assistance to Israel, Ukraine and Taiwan as they fight off aggression from Iran, Russia and China. The final vote was 79-18, a hint of bipartisanship in an era of division. The funding includes roughly $60 billion for Ukraine aid, $26 billion for Israel and $8 billion for Taiwan and Indo-Pacific security. The legislation now heads to President Joe Biden for enactment, following six months of tumultuous political struggles. However, this legislation encompasses various additional foreign policy initiatives, one of which entails compelling the Chinese parent company of TikTok, ByteDance, to sell the social media platform to Americans or risk a nationwide ban on the app. This clause mandates ByteDance to sell within nine months, with the possibility for President Biden to extend this period to a year. The foreign aid package has also been the subject of deep GOP infighting, causing threats by many House Republicans against House Speaker Mike Johnson’s position as leader. 

International

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Preliminary results reported by local media on Monday indicate that the political party of Maldives President Mohamed Muizzu has overwhelmingly won parliamentary elections, signaling strong support for his pro-China foreign policy. The People’s National Congress secured 70 out of 93 seats in Sunday’s vote. Alongside three seats secured by its allies, the People’s National Congress has gained complete control of Parliament, as per the initial results. In contrast, the Maldivian Democratic Party, led by former President Ibrahim Mohamed Solih, who is perceived as pro-India, held 65 seats in the previous Parliament but only managed to secure 15 seats this time. The election drew close attention from regional giants India and China, both vying for dominance in the archipelago nation, strategically positioned in the Indian Ocean.

On Wednesday, five military horses, startled by noise emanating from a construction site, bolted during routine exercises near Buckingham Palace. They threw off four riders and created chaos as they galloped through central London streets, colliding with vehicles during the busy morning rush hour. The disturbance unfolded while the horses, belonging to the Household Cavalry, were engaged in an extended exercise for an upcoming military parade. It is presumed that the commotion stemmed from the sound of concrete falling off a moving walkway at a construction site in Belgravia, an upscale neighborhood just west of the palace. Three of the soldiers who were dismounted required hospitalization for injuries. Fortunately, none of the injuries were considered life-threatening. Subsequently, the riderless horses ran through major roads in central London, colliding with vehicles and surprising commuters en route to work. The horses were swiftly recaptured and are now undergoing medical evaluations back at the barracks in Hyde Park.

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Michael Taromina
Michael Taromina, News Editor

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